Tag: Jason

Jason Splash VISIONS18

The remotely operated vehicle Jason, operated by Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, enters the NE Pacifc off Newport Oregon as part of the University of Washington led, NSF-OOI Cabled Array expedition. Credit: M. Elend, University of Washington, V18.

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Jason Launch with Junction Box

Jason launched over the side of the R/V Revelle during the NSF-funded OOI Cabled Array expedition. A low voltage junction box, built by the UW Applied Physics Lab, is latched under the vehicles 'belly' to safely take it to the seafloor. Credit: M. Elend, University of Washington, V18.

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Jason Control Van Leg 2

A view of the inside of the Jason control van at the beginning of Leg 2. Jason is working on the a Benthic Experiment Package off of Newport Oregon. Credit: Z. Cooper, University of Washington, V17.

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Working in the Jason Control Van

University of Washington School of Oceanography undergraduate students, Katie Gonzalez and Willem Weertman document the Pythias Oasis dive. Credit: M. Elend, University of Washington, V17.

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Inside the Jason Control Van Pythias Oasis

A diverse suite of displays allow monitoring of ROV operations in the control van during the dive to the Pythias Oasis Site discovered by, then, University of Washington School of Oceanography undergraduate Brendan Philp. The central large display shows the "Gusher" site, ringing by orange anemones and adjacent clams. The Jason manipulator holds a temperature probe used to measure the warm fluids. Credit: M. Elend, University of Washington, V17.

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First Launch of Jason

The ROV Jason enters the water at the Cabled Array Offshore Oregon site, water depth 600 m. Credit: M. Elend, University of Washington.

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Jason Splash

The ROV Jason enters the water for the first dive (J2970) of the UW-NSF Regional Cabled Array cruise. Credit: M. Elend, University of Washington.

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BEP Deck Operations

The Jason team rotates the vehicle in place for latching into the 3200 lb Benthic Experiment Platform for installation at the Oregon Shelf site. Credit: M. Elend, University of Washington, V16.

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