Tag: Axial Biology

Anemone_HPIES2

A pom-pom anemone at Axial Base, moving around the legs of the HPIES instrument. Photo Credit: UW/NSF-OOI/WHOI; V19

Read More »

Octopus_HPIES

A Graneledone octopus peeking at Jason around the side of the Axial Base HPIES instrument. Photo Credit: UW/NSF-OOI/WHOI; V19

Read More »

Limpets and Scale Worms

Community structure on the 16 m-tall hydrothermal structure 'El Guapo' changes with height above seafloor. Here, limpets, red scale worms and blue protists (ciliates) colonize the outer sulfide walls of the structure. Credit: UW/NSF-OOI/WHOI, V18.

Read More »

Life on El Guapo

Near the summit of the ~16 m-tall El Guapo chimney, sulfide worms  and tubeworms colonize the younger part of the new sulfide growth. Credit: UW/NSF-OOI/WHOI, V18.

Read More »

Tube Worm Bush 2011 Flow

A dense colony of tube worms awash in warm diffusely venting fluids grow on the April 2011 lava flow at the summit of Axial Seamount. UW/OOI-NSF/WHOI; J2-980; V17.

Read More »

3D Temperature Array and Life

A 3D temperature (thermistor) array housing 24 sensors rests above a small diffuse flow site a few meters away from the actively venting black smoker edifice called Mushroom in the ASHES hydrothermal field on Axial Seamount. This cabled instrument was designed and built by G. Proskurowski, UW School of Oceanography. Limpets have colonized the frame and cable housing the thermistors. An osmotic fluid sampler is inserted into the diffuse flow site to obtain chemistry coregistered with temperature. Credit: UW/NSF-OOI/WHOI; V16. 

Read More »

Linkages Between Vents and Life on a Volcano

A digital still camera (left), mass spectrometer (middle) and a fluid and microbial DNA sampler at the El Gordo vent in the International District Hydrothermal Field measure and sample fluids, animals, and microbes in this active processes within this hydrothermal system to understand linkages amoung seismicity (seismometers extend away from the field), venting and life in this extreme environment. Credit: UW/OOI-NSF/WHOI; Dive J2-212, V16.

Read More »
Close Panel