Tag: Southern Hydrate Ridge

Smokey Caverns Revisited

Once again the Smokey Caverns (or Taverns as it is also known) has changed remarkably since we visited it with Jason last year. The area is significantly more rugged, marked by large hummocks. An eelpout, sole, clams and orange rock fish dot the landscape. Credit: UW/NSF-OOI/WHOI, V18.

Read More »

Animals at Southern Hydrate Ridge

Collage of photos taken from screens in the control van showing microbial mats, hagfish, rockfish, flounders, shells chaff, clam, carbonate cobbles and methane seeps observed at Southern Hydrate Ridge. B-Y. Lee, University of Washington, V18.

Read More »

Dive Highlights R1845 Southern Hydrate Ridge

During decent of ROPOS Dive R1845, a bubble plume was detected on the sonar. The plume was followed to the seafloor, with the source at the Bubble 1 site. This area last year was a gently hollow – now it has a small collapse area and two cavities from which significant methane bubbles are emitted. ROPOS documented this area in detail as a possible installation site if Eisntein's Grotto dies re venting. A quick inspection was done on the digital still camera at Einstein's Grotto and the Neptunea snail nursery was imaged. Credit: NSF-OOI/UW/ISS; V15.

Read More »

Rugged Carbonate Peak

The 'Pinnacle' on the west side of the main methane seep site at Southern Hydrate Ridge, is a >20 m tall, rugged carbonate edifice teaming with life – dominated by high densities of soft corals, hagfish, and small squat lobsters that hide in small cavities. Credit: NSF-OOI/UW/ISS, V15.

Read More »

Life at Southern Hydrate Ridge

A rockfish and starfish are intermixed with clams near a bacterial mat on the methane seep site, Southern Hydrate Ridge during ROPOS Dive R1850. Credit: NSF-OOI/UW/ISS, V15.

Read More »

Neptunea Casing

A close up of a beautiful stalk of Neptunea snail eggs recovered from Southern Hydrate Ridge. Credit: Mitch Elend, University of Washington, V15.

Read More »

Neptunea Field

The Neptunea nursery in 2015 was devoid of tending snails on top of the egg stalks. Recovery of the stalks showed that the eggs are still viable. Credit: NSF-OOI/UW/ISS, Dive R1845, V15.

Read More »
Close Panel